Images by Date
Images by Category
Solar System
Stars
White Dwarfs
Supernovas
Neutron Stars
Black Holes
Milky Way Galaxy
Normal Galaxies
Quasars
Galaxy Clusters
Cosmology/Deep Field
Miscellaneous
Images by Interest
Chandra for Kids
Multiwavelength
Sky Map
Constellations
3D Wall
Photo Blog
Top Rated Images
Image Handouts
Desktops
High Res Prints
Fits Files
Image Tutorials
Photo Album Tutorial
False Color
Cosmic Distance
Look-Back Time
Scale & Distance
Angular Measurement
Images & Processing
AVM/Metadata
Getting Hard Copies
Image Use Policy
Web Shortcuts
Chandra Blog
RSS Feed
Chandra Mobile
Chronicle
Email Newsletter
News & Noteworthy
Image Use Policy
Questions & Answers
Glossary of Terms
Download Guide
Get Adobe Reader
More Images of Kepler's Supernova Remnant
1
X-ray, Optical & Infrared Composite of Kepler's SNR
On October 9, 1604, sky watchers -- including astronomer Johannes Kepler, spotted a "new star" in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of nearby planets. "Kepler's supernova" was the last exploding supernova seen in our Milky Way galaxy. Observers used only their eyes to study it, because the telescope was not yet invented. Now, astronomers have utilized NASA's three Great Observatories to analyze the supernova remnant in infrared, optical and X-ray light.
Scale: Image is 5 arcmin across
(Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)

2
Click for larger image X-ray (High Energy)
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image X-ray (Low Energy)
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Optical (Hubble)
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Infrared (Spitzer)
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
X-ray, Optical & Infrared Images of Kepler's SNR
The X-ray data of Kepler's SNR show regions with multimillion degree gas, or extremely high energy particles. The higher-energy X-rays (blue) come primarily from the regions directly behind the shock front. Lower-energy X-rays (green) mark the location of the hot remains of the exploded star. The optical image reveals 10,000 degrees Celsius gas where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The infrared image highlights microscopic dust particles swept up and heated by the supernova shock wave.
Scale: Each image is 5 arcmin across
(Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)

3
Kepler's SNR: 6-Panel From Chandra, Hubble & Spitzer
These images represent views of Kepler's supernova remnant taken in X-rays, visible light, and infrared radiation. The top panels show the entire remnant. The bottom panels are close-up views of the remnant's upper right corner. The images indicate that the bubble of gas that makes up the supernova remnant appears different in various types of light. Chandra reveals the hottest gas (here shown in red,green & blue), which radiates in X-rays. Hubble shows the brightest, densest gas (yellow), which appears in visible light. Spitzer unveils heated dust (red), which radiates in infrared light.
Scale: Full Field image is 5 arcmin across
(Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)

4
Click for larger image Chandra
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Hubble
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Spitzer
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Zoom In
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Zoom In
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Click for larger image Zoom In
Jpeg, Tiff, PS
Kepler's SNR: Individual Views From Chandra, Hubble & Spitzer
The Chandra data was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on June 30, 2000 for about 14 hours. Hubble's image was taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on August 28/29, 2003 & May 26, 2004 for a total of 6.5 hours. The Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) and Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) were used to collect data on August 25, 2004 and September 3, 2004 for 1.5 hours.
Scale: Full Field images are 5 arcmin across
(Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)

5
Chandra X-ray Image with Scale Bar
Scalebar = 1.5 arcmin
(Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)



Return to Kepler's Supernova Remnant (06 Oct 04)